Frequently Asked Questions

We want you to feel completely comfortable in your decision to become an egg donor and we know education is vital. We have anticipated the questions you may have and answered them below. Please do not hesitate to contact us directly if we can help you with anything additional.

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No. Each month many eggs are dissolved and absorbed by ovulating women’s bodies prior to the selection of the single egg that will be ovulated. Fertility medications preserve a portion of these excess eggs which the body would have ordinarily discarded. Therefore no additional eggs are used up in the process.

As with any medical procedure, there are risks involved. You will have an opportunity to discuss the potential risks with a clinician during your screening process. The following risks are ones that you should consider:

  • Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS):

    Occasionally excess fluid from the ovaries will transfer into the abdominal cavity causing moderate to severe bloating. If a significant amount of fluid is present, it will be removed in a procedure very similar to the egg retrieval and IV fluids are given in replacement. In mild to moderate cases of OHSS, the fluid is slowly reabsorbed over the course of several days. Approximately 1-3% of women will experience significant OHSS. In order to reduce this risk, donors may be given different medications or a change in protocol to help eliminate or significantly decrease the risk of donors having OHSS.
  • Ovarian Torsion:

    Very rarely the ovary can twist on itself causing a sudden onset of severe pain on one or both sides. The risk of ovarian torsion is less than 1%. For a period of time, donors are asked to discontinue activities such as running, moderate to high impact aerobic activity, horseback riding and strenuous lifting to further decrease this risk.
  • Medication Side effects:

    The medications utilized during a donation cycle are generally well tolerated.  If you were to experience side effects, they may include   bloating, moodiness, cramping, aching, PMS-like symptoms, headaches, nausea, hot flashes or breast tenderness.

You will need to come in for approximately 6 to 10 appointments until your eggs have fully developed.

You will receive light IV sedation during the egg retrieval process, but you may have some discomfort afterwards. Every person has a different experience but most are able to return to work the next day, and others may need an additional day to recover from the procedure.

Our main retrieval location is located in Orlando near UCF.  Throughout the process you will be monitored at our physicians office.

No. Each month many eggs are dissolved and absorbed by ovulating women’s bodies prior to the selection of the single egg that will be ovulated. Fertility medications preserve a portion of these excess eggs which the body would have ordinarily discarded. Therefore no additional eggs are used up in the process.

Yes, provided you are no longer breastfeeding and have not breastfed for at least two months or have had two regular periods

Egg donor agencies deal with fresh egg donors, while egg banks like us deal with frozen donor eggs. If you choose to become a fresh egg donor, there is no guarantee you will be matched with a recipient, but once you are matched, then you would need to sync the medical process with the recipient – which means you have much less control over timing, traveling, and the overall egg donation process. Ultimately, what this means is that you run the risk of not being compensated for your time and services if you are never matched with a donor egg recipient.  If you choose to be an egg bank donor, however, you would go through a much easier and stress-free process.

t is your decision to choose between becoming an Anonymous or Non-Anonymous egg donor.  If you choose to become an Anonymous egg donor, no one can ever demand that Cryos disclose your identity. Neither parents, children, relatives, authorities nor others may obtain your identity from Cryos. However, Cryos is obligated by law to keep a record of your identity for 30 years starting from your last donation.   If you choose to become a Non-Anonymous egg donor, children can learn your identity upon reaching 18 years of age if they can document or provide evidence to support the probability that they are the result of a treatment with donor eggs from a specific, Non-Anonymous egg donor from Cryos. In other words, you may be contacted at some future time by children conceived using your eggs.

You will need to come in for approximately 6 to 10 appointments until your eggs have fully developed.

When you come in for a morning monitoring appointment at our physicians office, blood will be drawn to assess your hormone levels. Following the blood draw, your ovaries will be evaluated using an ultrasound. This ultrasound will show how your follicles are growing and help evaluate what dosage of medication to give you that evening. You might have to come in after 3 or 4 nights of medication towards the beginning of the cycle but nearing the end you will be in every day or every other day. The donation cycle usually lasts for 10-14 days and you will get an approximate calendar to follow. You will be contacted every day you are in for monitoring to be given the dosage of medication to take that night as well as to confirm your next appointment.

As with any medical procedure, there are risks involved. You will have an opportunity to discuss the potential risks with a clinician during your screening process. The following risks are ones that you should consider:

  • Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS):

    Occasionally excess fluid from the ovaries will transfer into the abdominal cavity causing moderate to severe bloating. If a significant amount of fluid is present, it will be removed in a procedure very similar to the egg retrieval and IV fluids are given in replacement. In mild to moderate cases of OHSS, the fluid is slowly reabsorbed over the course of several days. Approximately 1-3% of women will experience significant OHSS. In order to reduce this risk, donors may be given different medications or a change in protocol to help eliminate or significantly decrease the risk of donors having OHSS.
  • Ovarian Torsion:

    Very rarely the ovary can twist on itself causing a sudden onset of severe pain on one or both sides. The risk of ovarian torsion is less than 1%. For a period of time, donors are asked to discontinue activities such as running, moderate to high impact aerobic activity, horseback riding and strenuous lifting to further decrease this risk.
  • Medication Side effects:

    The medications utilized during a donation cycle are generally well tolerated.  If you were to experience side effects, they may include   bloating, moodiness, cramping, aching, PMS-like symptoms, headaches, nausea, hot flashes or breast tenderness.

Screening involves a physical and pelvic exam, infectious disease testing, genetic screening and a psychological evaluation including a psychological health history and an evaluation of your comfort level with the donor egg program. The genetic and infectious disease testing is very extensive and implements the most advanced technology available today. All appointments will be arranged for you or performed on site or at the physicians office. 

Due to the dedication, time and effort required by participation in the donor egg program, you will be adequately compensated for each donation cycle you complete.  Compensation is paid in two installments. The first installment will be paid when all the necessary paperwork as well as the extended profile have been completed and the stimulation medications are started. The second (and final) installment will be paid on the day of the actual retrieval of the eggs. We encourage you to donate multiple times, but will always be in close contact with you after each cycle to inquire about your interest for another cycle.  All fees and medical costs related to your egg donation are paid by Cryos.