Egg Freezing FAQ

150 Characters left

Thank you

Thank you for submitting your quesiton

Most popular

Cryos uses vitrification to freeze your eggs. Eggs are the largest cell in the human body and consist mostly of cytoplasm. Cytoplasm is liquid and when liquid is frozen, ice crystals form as part of the process. Ice crystals can rupture cell membranes and kill the cell.

Vitrification is a process in which the liquid in the egg is removed and replaced with a cryoprotectant. Once the egg is loaded with cryoprotectant it is submerged in liquid nitrogen (-196°C / -320.8°F) and the egg is “flash frozen”. This process does not allow ice crystals to form and damage the egg.

Once your eggs are frozen, we are able to store them in our storage tanks.

After your orientation at Cryos, you will be responsible for paying a consultation fee of $250 to schedule your initial appointment with the Physician. If you complete the egg freezing program, this $250 is credited back.

The cost of an egg freezing cycle is $9,600. This includes all testing, monitoring, retrieval including anesthesia, egg freezing and the first three (3) years of storage.

The egg freezing cycle cost does not include medications, as medication cost is variable and patient specific, but it is expected to be between $2,000 - $4,000 per cycle.

Please note: the cost of future egg thawing or IVF is not included.

In 2012, following numerous studies comparing children from frozen eggs with children born through natural conception with no increased rate of birth defects found, The American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) declared egg freezing to no longer be an experimental practice.

In 2014 a study was done comparing outcomes from 1,224 fresh IVF cycles and 1,027 frozen egg cycles and in this study, no differences were found in the rate of obstetric problems including diabetes, pregnancy induced hypertension, preterm birth and anemia. Additionally, there were no differences in the gestational age at birth, birth weight, Apgar scores, birth defects, admission to neonatal ICU, perinatal mortality, or puerperal problems. Similarly, hundreds of thousands of children have been born from frozen embryos with no increase in birth defects.

Cryos uses vitrification to freeze your eggs. Eggs are the largest cell in the human body and consist mostly of cytoplasm. Cytoplasm is liquid and when liquid is frozen, ice crystals form as part of the process. Ice crystals can rupture cell membranes and kill the cell.

Vitrification is a process in which the liquid in the egg is removed and replaced with a cryoprotectant. Once the egg is loaded with cryoprotectant it is submerged in liquid nitrogen (-196°C / -320.8°F) and the egg is “flash frozen”. This process does not allow ice crystals to form and damage the egg.

Once your eggs are frozen, we are able to store them in our storage tanks.

Cryopreserved (frozen) eggs can be stored indefinitely. Live births have been reported using eggs that were frozen over ten years ago, however, because egg vitrification is a relatively new procedure the upper limit for which they can be stored is unknown. 

Embryos have been stored for decades with great success and there is no reason to suspect that eggs will be any different.

The number of eggs you should store depends on your age at the time of retrieval. Based on existing studies, calculating average egg thaw and fertilization rates, we recommend a minimum of 10 frozen eggs for each IVF cycle or pregnancy attempt you want to plan for. Most women 38 years of age and under can expect to cryopreserve (freeze) 10-20 eggs per cycle.

A female is born with all of the eggs she will ever have, and over time they diminish in number and quality. This decline explains why a woman in her 40’s has only a 5% chance of becoming pregnant each month. Cryos will lead you through a series of questions to help determine the right time to freeze your eggs. Typically, we recommend taking advantage of premium egg quality during prime reproductive years – your 20’s and early 30’s.

We expect pregnancy rates from frozen eggs to depend on the woman’s age at the time she freezes her eggs. Cryos therefore does not freeze eggs for patients over 38 years old, as the chance of future pregnancy in women older than 38 at the time of freezing is likely to be lower than that seen for younger women.

Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH) is a protein hormone produced by cells within the ovary. By clearly understanding your AMH levels, our staff is able to assess your ovarian egg reserve. AMH levels naturally lower as you get older.

In 2012, following numerous studies comparing children from frozen eggs with children born through natural conception with no increased rate of birth defects found, The American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) declared egg freezing to no longer be an experimental practice.

In 2014 a study was done comparing outcomes from 1,224 fresh IVF cycles and 1,027 frozen egg cycles and in this study, no differences were found in the rate of obstetric problems including diabetes, pregnancy induced hypertension, preterm birth and anemia. Additionally, there were no differences in the gestational age at birth, birth weight, Apgar scores, birth defects, admission to neonatal ICU, perinatal mortality, or puerperal problems. Similarly, hundreds of thousands of children have been born from frozen embryos with no increase in birth defects.

After your orientation at Cryos, you will be responsible for paying a consultation fee of $250 to schedule your initial appointment with the Physician. If you complete the egg freezing program, this $250 is credited back.

The cost of an egg freezing cycle is $9,600. This includes all testing, monitoring, retrieval including anesthesia, egg freezing and the first three (3) years of storage.

The egg freezing cycle cost does not include medications, as medication cost is variable and patient specific, but it is expected to be between $2,000 - $4,000 per cycle.

Please note: the cost of future egg thawing or IVF is not included.

The cost of egg freezing at Cryos is based on one egg freezing cycle.

We do also have an egg freezing guarantee to help ensure you freeze the number of eggs you need for the future.

The cost of egg freezing may be prohibitive for some individuals and couples, but we do offer financing to help you with this option for fertility preservation. Our Financial Counselor will sit with you and go over all of the available options at the initial visit.

It depends on the terms of your insurance. This is a highly individualized question, but we have many patients whose insurance covers a small portion of treatment, including ovarian reserve testing.